Action-Domain-Responder

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned about Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

MVC was created in 1979, in a context of desktop applications with CLI user interfaces and it implied that the UI would be changed automatically if there were changes in the database, caused by some factor external to the user. The same pattern was perfectly usable later on desktop applications with a GUI.

However, its usage in web applications has always been an adaptation because most web applications don’t change the UI as a consequence of changes that happen in the server side, there is always a call from the UI asking the server side for an update of the screen.

I have talked about variants of the MVC pattern before, this post is about another variant: Action-Domain-Responder, created by Paul M. Jones. Continue reading “Action-Domain-Responder”

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Resource-Method-Representation

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned about Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

MVC was created in 1979, in a context of desktop applications with CLI user interfaces and it implied that the UI would be changed automatically if there were changes in the database, caused by some factor external to the user. The same pattern was perfectly usable later on desktop applications with a GUI.

However, its usage in web applications has always been an adaptation because most web applications don’t change the UI as a consequence of changes that happen in the server side, there is always a call from the UI asking the server side for an update of the screen.

I have talked about variants of the MVC pattern before, this post is about another variant: Resource-Method-Representation.

I feel the need to talk about it, not because I find it a key pattern in my practice but because of the misconception that it is the same as the ADR pattern, of which I will write about soon. Continue reading “Resource-Method-Representation”

“Model 1” & “Model 2”

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned about Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

Java Server Pages (JSP) is a technology, a scripting language comparable to PHP, ASP, or even Python, that is used to create server-side pages interpreted by the JVM and which can use Java objects.

The first JSP specifications, published in 1998 by Sun Microsystems, defined two ways of structuring an application so that the presentation logic would be decoupled from the business logic, and even the use cases, in an HTTP request/response paradigm.

Some consider these “Model 1” and “Model 2” the first tries at adapting the MVC pattern, originally intended for a context of desktop software development, to the web HTTP request/response paradigm. Continue reading ““Model 1” & “Model 2””

More than concentric layers

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned on Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

In my previous post in this series, I published an infographic that reflects the mental map I use to figure out the relationships between the code units types.

However, there was something that I always felt it was not very well reflected there, but I just didn’t know how to do it any better: the shared kernel.

Furthermore, I figured out a few more things, and I’m gonna write about it all in this post!

Continue reading “More than concentric layers”

Deployments with containers

This post is part of The Containerization Chronicles, a series of posts about Containerization. In them, I write about my experiments and what I’ve learned on Containerization of applications. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

Now that we have the project integrated with a Continuous Integration server, where we run the tests and report back to GitHub pull requests with the results of the test run and the coverage, we can deploy our project and make it available on the Internet.

We will do so with Heroku. I have chosen Heroku because it allows me to perform these experiments for free.

If you want to jump into the code, this is the tag for this post.

Continue reading “Deployments with containers”

Integration with CodeCov

This post is part of The Containerization Chronicles, series of posts about Containerization. In them, I write about my experiments and what I’ve learned on Containerization of applications. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

This is a fairly small post, as it is really simple to integrate with CodeCov. Follow the instructions on their website to create your account and set up the repository and follow along with this post.

To be honest, we don’t even really need this integration at this point, because Scrutinizer can already give us a nice badge for the code coverage, as well as fail the build if the coverage degrades. Nevertheless, CodeCov gives us all that plus a much more detailed report about the coverage than just the final coverage rating, and the possibility to fail the build if the coverage of the pull request is below the limit, or results in a global coverage below the limit.

If you want to jump right into the code, this is the tag on GitHub.

Continue reading “Integration with CodeCov”

Continuous Integration with containers

This post is part of The Containerization Chronicles, a series of posts about Containerization. In them, I write about my experiments and what I’ve learned on Containerization of applications. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

Now that we have some containers in place for development, we can integrate with a CI server. I chose Scrutinizer CI because of the code analysis it makes, the fact that it is also a CI server it’s a plus. However, as a CI, it has some limitations, which I will talk about later on when integrating with Heroku, so we will most likely move to another CI engine later in the future while keeping Scrutinizer only for the code analysis but, for now, this is all we need.

To set up the CI, we will:

  1. Containerize an environment to run the tests in the CI
  2. Configure Scrutinizer
  3. Add the scrutinizer badges to the README.md
  4. Integrate Scrutinizer with GitHub

If you want to jump right into the code, this is the tag on GitHub.

Continue reading “Continuous Integration with containers”