Architecture 1st design step: Partitioning

There are many ways of partitioning an application. Usually, what we do is actually classify the code according to some criteria and organise the code following that criteria.

This chapter of the book explores four criteria:

  • Functionality vs. Domain;
  • Conway’s Law;
  • Geographic constraints;
  • Cultural concerns.

All in all, the idea is that we partition our codebase with long-term local autonomy in mind, according to history, standards and conventions, experience and common sense (Coplien 2010, p.91).

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What is Lean and Agile about Software Architecture

Good Software Architecture embodies several Lean and Agile principles, always with the same goal of long-term productivity and lightweight feature development.

Delaying structural decisions will outcome in undisciplined structure, which in turn outcomes in waste. Therefore we must think of Software Architecture as an investment that we need to make now to get medium and long term gain.

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Stakeholder engagement: Trimming wasted time

In my previous posts, I briefly described the stakeholders. However, they are not Lean nor Agile themselves. What is really important, for Lean and Agile, is how they work together: Everybody, all together, from early on. Continue reading “Stakeholder engagement: Trimming wasted time”

Stakeholder engagement: The end-users

There are five major stakeholder areas :

  • End-users
  • Business
  • Customers
  • Domain experts
  • Developers

Both Agile and Lean tell us to break the traditional approach of contacting the stakeholders at a specific moment of the project development, and instead keep a permanent contact with them throughout the project development.

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