Programming Language evolution

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned on Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

Programming languages themselves are not an artefact of architecture, but I would feel that The Chronicles of Software Architecture would be missing something if I wouldn’t write about it.

So, let’s make a quick review of programming languages history, its evolution and check what we can learn from it. I’ve added some dates to the post just as a curiosity, they should be seen as rough estimates, the important is the evolution sequence and the problems they were trying to solve.

Continue reading “Programming Language evolution”

Advertisements

Software Architecture Premises

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned on Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

In this post, I establish the very first concepts about Software Architecture, that will be needed in order to better understand the following posts.

Continue reading “Software Architecture Premises”

Architecture 1st design step: Partitioning

There are many ways of partitioning an application. Usually, what we do is actually classify the code according to some criteria and organise the code following that criteria.

This chapter of the book explores four criteria:

  • Functionality vs. Domain;
  • Conway’s Law;
  • Geographic constraints;
  • Cultural concerns.

All in all, the idea is that we partition our codebase with long-term local autonomy in mind, according to history, standards and conventions, experience and common sense (Coplien 2010, p.91).

Continue reading “Architecture 1st design step: Partitioning”

What is Lean and Agile about Software Architecture

Good Software Architecture embodies several Lean and Agile principles, always with the same goal of long-term productivity and lightweight feature development.

Delaying structural decisions will outcome in undisciplined structure, which in turn outcomes in waste. Therefore we must think of Software Architecture as an investment that we need to make now to get medium and long term gain.

Continue reading “What is Lean and Agile about Software Architecture”

Stakeholder engagement: Trimming wasted time

In my previous posts, I briefly described the stakeholders. However, they are not Lean nor Agile themselves. What is really important, for Lean and Agile, is how they work together: Everybody, all together, from early on. Continue reading “Stakeholder engagement: Trimming wasted time”

DDD Europe 2017: The 3 talks I most enjoyed

Last week I attended the DDD Europe conference. This was the 2nd edition, and it was held in Amsterdam, where I live. The company where I work, Werkspot, sponsored my ticket, so what else could I wish for?!

Well, actually I could wish for a good conference, and it was! Very experienced developers were speaking there: Vaughn Vernon, Udy Dahan, Nick Tune, Greg Young, Alberto Brandolini, Paul Raynes, the inevitable Eric Evans, and even Melvin Conway which is probably around 80 years old by now!!

I attended twelve talks and this post is about the three talks I found more interesting.

Some of the talks from 2016 are available on their YouTube channel, I suppose at some point they will make some of 2017 available as well.

Continue reading “DDD Europe 2017: The 3 talks I most enjoyed”