Ports & Adapters Architecture

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned on Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

The Ports & Adapters Architecture (aka Hexagonal Architecture) was thought of by Alistair Cockburn and written down on his blog in 2005. This is how he defines its goal in one sentence:

Allow an application to equally be driven by users, programs, automated test or batch scripts, and to be developed and tested in isolation from its eventual run-time devices and databases.

Alistair Cockburn 2005, Ports and Adapters

I’ve seen some articles talking about the Ports & Adapters Architecture that said a lot about layers. However, I haven’t read anything about layers in the original Alistair Cockburn post.

The idea is to think about our application as the central artefact of a system, where all input and output reaches/leaves the application through a port that isolates the application from external tools, technologies and delivery mechanisms. The application should have no knowledge of who/what is sending input or receiving its output. This is intended to provide some protection against the evolution of technology and business requirements, which can make products obsolete shortly after they are developed, because of technology/vendor lock-down.

In this post, I’m going to dive into the following subjects:

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EBI Architecture

This post is part of The Software Architecture Chronicles, a series of posts about Software Architecture. In them, I write about what I’ve learned on Software Architecture, how I think of it, and how I use that knowledge. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

The Entity-Boundary-Interactor (EBI) Architecture has been made known by Robert C. Martin in his talks about Clean Architecture (of which I will talk in a later post).

However, this pattern was published by Ivar Jacobson back in 1992, in his book Object-Oriented Software Engineering: A use case driven approach. At the time, Jacobson actually called it Entity-Interface-Control, but the name was changed so that “Interface” would not be confused with the “Interface” language construct (which some languages don’t even have) nor with “User Interface”, and “Control” would not be confused with the MVC Controller.

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